Survival

Survival

Some basics tips on how to navigate using the Military Grid Reference System (MGRS), a compass, and a protractor.

Tip on Navigating using the Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) by: KDtech.org Some basics tips on how to navigate using the Military Grid Reference System (MGRS), a compass, and a protractor.

It is the most puzzling experience to see people armed to the teeth, have the most complex bug out bag you’ve ever seen, have the ultimate food supply, and even have a great emergency plan; yet my initial impression of them is they are likely to die from some type of coronary disease before ever coming close to a time where they may to deploy all that fantastic gear. In my opinion the readiness community is among the most mentally strong group in existence. We see the world for what it is and despite all the gloom and doom we constantly adapt our methods while the rest of world waits to experience Darwin’s theory of natural selection first hand. However, the Achilles heel I would have to say is usually within the realm of physical readiness. How can you realistically expect to carry your B.O.B or get home when your heart is racing after going up a flight of stairs?

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We all have been there. Working out is not always fun. Our minds are hardwired to avoid discomfort. Weights are heavy and it makes your muscles hurt afterwards and don’t even get me started on running. The problem herein lies that your level of fitness directly correlates to your ability to survive a stressful situation. It isn’t the amount of training that you have that will determine your actions when the time comes; it is the amount of training you have under stress that makes or breaks an outcome of a critical situation. No one EVER rises to the occasion. Under stress you WILL default to your level of training. This is where martial arts training fills the void.

Jedburgh Targets: Fight the drill don't game the shots!

While training martial arts you will put yourself in a direct aggressive confrontation(s) with people on a regular basis. In the beginning your actions will be furious, you will put forth your best efforts, and using all your muscle to gain a position of advantage but in the end you will spend the majority of your time fighting to survive. Most of the time you will not survive. However over time your actions will become more refined and your reflexes will adapt. Eventually your frantic survival will become a series of coordinated sets of defenses and attacks to secure victory as you enter the fray. Essentially developing the mind, body, and spirit to engage at a moments notice with confidence that you can win. We always have to approach our preparedness while maintaining a sense of reality of the paradigm that we currently live in. We still live in a country governed by the rule of law. At times these laws can prohibit from the carrying of our firearms. We are also human beings fully capable of mistakes and sometimes can even forget to carry our firearm at times. With a solid foundation in martial arts even as you walk among the sheep, the sheepdog never has to be without fangs. With regards to living in a situation without rule of law; keep in mind ammunition is finite and heavy. Anything can happen from losing your load-out to running out of ammunition. Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong and it will always be at the most inconvenient of times. Training will not only give the strength to carry that load-out but the presence of mind to remain calm when things seem bleak. Whenever I would compete against someone I always kept in mind the principals of close quarters combat from the Ranger Handbook “Speed, surprise, and violence of action.” I was never a Special Operations Soldier but as a martial artist I can safely say the principals and mindset of combat are universal. The only thing that changes is the means. Having all the gear in the world means nothing if you haven’t taken the time to develop your mind and body. Humans are more important then hardware. It’s a dangerous and war torn world. Be so prepared for war that you always live in peace… “Where there’s discomfort, there’s fear, in these very tough positions, you’re in a little piece of hell. And through this daily suffering, you learn to survive in these situations. You have to find comfort in uncomfortable positions. You have to be able to live in your worst nightmare. That is what Jiu Jitsu gave me.” – Master Rickson Gracie ABOUT THE AUTHOR John Valentine is Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Purple Belt under 8th Degree Coral Belt Pedro Sauer. John is a submission-grappling medalist who has competed and trained internationally. John spent 8 years as an active duty United States Army Paratrooper. John is certified in Modern Army Combatives and various physical fitness systems. John has also been deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan.  

#Survival Jason explains a few tips on fire basics. Don't take it for granted, that you'll be able to start a fire in inclement weather! #BeReady Jason is a Junior instructor here at CAGmain and is a life long Boy Scout... https://youtu.be/MTkAC8BxH4I #Survival Jason explains a few tips on fire basics. Don't take it for granted, that you'll be able to start a fire in inclement weather! #BeReady Jason is a Junior instructor here at CAGmain and is a life long Boy Scout...

Crisis Application Group READY-SURE-SECURE

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https://youtu.be/VI4nycwiqnY Its more important now than ever that we have the right people with the right gear. Getting ready for an emergency is everyone's personal responsibility with in the boundaries of their capabilities. We have tested multiple chest seals here at CAGmain and I have of course experience while on active duty. The reigning champ so far is the Hyfin vented twin pack. There are other good products but for the cost and durability we use the Hyfin. Available at SHOPCAG $14.99 More on the Hyfins: http://cagmain.com/shop-cag/#!/Hyfin-Vent-Chest-Seal-Twin-Pack/p/50869901/category=13227552 They can also be found in the CAG tier 1 IFAK: http://cagmain.com/shop-cag/#!/CAG-Tier-1-Med-Pack/p/50478734/category=13147503 Here's a link to the new compact version that we haven't tested yet: http://www.narescue.com/portal.aspx?CN=6A6CFEAD5E58 Product specs from the manufacturer: North American Rescue The new HyFin Vent Chest Seal Twin Pack from North American Rescue sets the standard for the treatment of penetrating injuries to the chest. Providing two vented chest seals in one unique package for treatment of both entry/exit or multiple penetrating injuries to the chest. The new HyFin Vent Chest Seal design provides 3-vented channels that prevent airflow into the chest cavity during inspiration while allowing air to escape through the vent channels during exhalation. The 3-vent channels allow blood to escape and also provide a backup fail-safe system, as even if two of the three channels become obstructed, the vent will remain fully operational. Advanced adhesive technology provides superior adhesion in the most adverse conditions, including sweaty or hairy casualties. Packaged in a rugged, easy-to-open foil pouch, the perforated packaging allows rescuers to open only one dressing at a time as needed. Each chest seal also includes a gauze pad to wipe the wound surface prior to application. Each HyFin Vent Chest Seal has a large, Red-Tip ™ pull tab for single-step peel-and-apply application and allows for the burping of the wound if necessary. The clear, transparent backing allows for easy placement over the wound area and conformability to the patient’s chest. Meets or exceeds the current EMS Standard of Care and TCCC & TECC Guidelines for treatment of penetrating injuries to the chest, the new HyFin Vent Chest Seal Twin Pack is the superior prehospital chest seal. Special Features: Patented, new design with 3-channel pressure relief vents Two Chest Seals for the treatment of both entry/exit or multiple penetrating injuries Advanced adhesive technology for a superior seal in the most adverse conditions, including sweaty or hairy casualties 3-vent channels that prevent airflow into the chest cavity during inspiration while allowing air to escape through the vent channels during exhalation Vent channels allow blood to escape and provides a backup fail-safe system as even if two of the three channels become obstructed, the vent will remain fully operational Easy-to-grip, large Red-Tip™ tab for single step, peel-and-apply application that allows for the burping of the wound if necessary Rugged, easy-to-open foil package featuring signature Red-Tip Technology™ tear notches with perforated packaging allowing rescuers to open only one dressing at a time as needed Weights and Dimensions: Packaged: Folded: H7.5 in. x W4.5 in. x D0.25 in. Unfolded: L7.5 in. x W9 in. x D 0.13 in. Chest Seal Size When Deployed: H 6 in. x W 6 in. Weight: 2.5 oz. US Patent 7,504,549 & Patent(s) Pending

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The students that attended the CAG Navigator course conducted over 40 hours of classroom and hands on training. They worked in instructor led navigation groups, team navigation events and individual events. In total, each student traveled approximately 20 miles. Early movements were without a backpack, latter movements were with "bug out bags". The students had to push themselves to achieve their goals. They had to learn teamwork and how to travel based on overall capabilities of the team. The students that attended the CAG Navigator course conducted over 40 hours of classroom and hands on training. They worked in instructor led navigation groups, team navigation events and individual events. In total, each student traveled approximately 20 miles. Early movements were without a backpack, latter movements were with "bug out bags". The students had to push themselves to achieve their goals. They had to learn teamwork and how to travel based on overall capabilities of the team. Students learned how to:
  • Plot points on a map
  • Give a grid to their location
  • How to use major terrain features to pinpoint their location
  • How to set an azimuth on a map
  • Compensate for magnetic north and grid north
  • Use phone apps to navigate
  • Estimate distance
  • Keep a pace count and a plethora of other skills and topics.
All in all it was a great training exercise. I am pretty happy with the overall motivation and lack of whining. These guys and gals aren't keyboard warriors, they actually do stuff.

CRISIS APPLICATION GROUP

READY-SURE-SECURE

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