So I'm breaking away a little from my usual blogging topic of discussing the goings on here on our farm to talk a bit about self sufficiency for the typical suburbanite. That is, if the typical suburbanite is ready to become an atypical suburbanite?

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So what is someone to do? How does one hedge against this current system that will likely one day fail, but not before food prices skyrocket out of control? Many folks seek out small local farms such as ours, to support and get their food from. But ultimately, you have to take some matters into your own hands and grow some of your own food. Naturally the first thing one may think of is planting a garden. Sadly, in America this is no longer normal and many communities actually have ordinances against tilling up a lawn to plant a garden. Most subdivisions were not designed with vegetable gardens in mind with shaded and sloping lots not to mention the minimal amount of soil available to plant in. But you should not allow these obstacles to keep you from your goal of self sufficiency.

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So what can you do? First of all, if you don't live in a neighborhood that deprives you of your right to garden your own land, I strongly recommend getting a copy of the book, Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew. This was my number one resource when I first started gardening. This method uses raised beds, does not require the uses of a tiller and is great for sloping ground. Rather than planting directly into your soil, which is likely very deficient, vegetables are planted into a soil mix of compost, peat moss, and vermiculite. The book spells it all out in a very simple and easy to understand verbiage. [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="125"] Square Foot Gardening[/caption] Read the rest of this article Here. [caption id="attachment_94" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Food so real its righteous! Food so real its righteous![/caption]