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Live Broad Cast with TruExodus

Baret Fawbush of TruExodus will be doing a live broadcast for the CAG membership! Here's a chance to ask your questions directly. He's a controversial guy but the kid can shoot, CAG members will have the opportunity to hear what he has to say! #ReadySureSecure www.CAGmain.com Join CAG and earn tabs for your skills! #Survival #Marksmanship #AustereMedicine #Communication 17264620_1298199473561178_6672866683467516460_n
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Triggers.

These days it seems like literally EVERYONE has the answer to your stock firearm. Not to mention a laundry list of complaints. More than I can recall, I seem to read about triggers. Everything from "crunchy" to "dragging" to God only knows what. Every gun god in the world seems to have all of the answers to correct the firearm that the manufacturer deemed sale-worthy. Do I have a counterpoint? Why, yes I do.Factory vs Custom? Make your case! These days it seems like literally EVERYONE has the answer to your stock firearm. Not to mention a laundry list of complaints. More than I can recall, I seem to read about triggers. Everything from "crunchy" to "dragging" to God only knows what. Every gun god in the world seems to have all of the answers to correct the firearm that the manufacturer deemed sale-worthy. Do I have a counterpoint? Why, yes I do.

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Although triggers may be made to look awesome and indeed significantly up the performance of what would otherwise be a standard firearm, there remains a vast level of places where this simply is not an option. Most law enforcement agencies will not allow personnel to modify their duty weapons, leaving that factory trigger in place. Guess what? DEAL WITH IT!! You had damned well better learn to operate that weapon with the garbage trigger the maker thoughtlessly crammed in there - not taking into account that boxes of bullets you may have to sling at the zombie horde. trigger2 Personally I feel the same way about many mechanical modifications as I do about other upgrades. Worth it? You bet your ass. So long as your SKILL matches the money spent. You may not have the luxury of always having a heavily modified race pistol always at your disposal. Better hope you trained that stock trigger to the best of your ability. Think of it this way: put it in the same category as your iron sights. Sure, lots of people race out and drop a fancy sight or scope on their weapon as fast as they can afford to. But - do they really have good cause? Or do we go back and reread "Tacticool" again? *Sigh* trigger3 If you're not shooting 3 Gun or some other form of competition where speed is a measured factor...spend the money on TRAINING. Here come the comments about that extra .023 seconds that could save your life in a gunfight. From people that have NEVER been in one and likely never will. I'm not saying not make the mods. I'm saying to make the mods once your are FULLY COMPETENT to use them effectively.

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Note that here at Crisis Application Group, we base our curriculum more on "grey matter investment" than measuring barrels. Making sure that your mind and body are trained equally to the task of the sexiest weapons. Now...make your argument! [caption id="attachment_981" align="aligncenter" width="640"]Firearms, Tactical & Defense Training Firearms, Tactical & Defense Training[/caption]
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Intro to Long Range Precision Shooting

A question that keeps coming up in the preparedness circles is whether or not there is a role for the “sniper”. Due to the variations in why people choose to be prepared, I'll leave that up to you. What I will do is give you a brief definition of a few terms. A simple definition of a sniper is skilled military shooter or spotter/shooter team that is tasked to engage targets from concealment, usually at distances that exceed the enemy's standard weapons and detection capabilities. Often they act forward of enemy lines and more often than not, simply conduct surveillance and report information back to higher headquarters. The role has been popularized by Hollywood which often portrays some very unrealistic events.

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A question that keeps coming up in the preparedness circles is whether or not there is a role for the “sniper”. Due to the variations in why people choose to be prepared, I'll leave that up to you. What I will do is give you a brief definition of a few terms. A simple definition of a sniper is skilled military shooter or spotter/shooter team that is tasked to engage targets from concealment, usually at distances that exceed the enemy's standard weapons and detection capabilities. Often they act forward of enemy lines and more often than not, simply conduct surveillance and report information back to higher headquarters. The role has been popularized by Hollywood which often portrays some very unrealistic events.

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The sniper employs a combination of skills which include camouflage, concealment, radio communications, and an in depth knowledge of exterior ballistics and fieldcraft, among other things. A sniper may engage targets from any range within his rifle's maximum effective range, sometimes pushing that envelope even farther. Typically targets will be beyond 4-5 hundred meters, which is beyond the range the average soldier is trained with the typical service rifle. Typically, a sniper carries out specific missions and has little to no support. Some examples of rifles used by the Sniper are the SR-25, M24, Mk13, M14, Remington MSR and many others. The Designated Marksman (DM), sometimes called Squad Designated Marksman (SDM) are terms that are often mistakenly used interchangeably with the term Sniper. The role is entirely different. Their role is to provide rapid accurate fire for their fireteam out to about 500 meters. They usually use more accurized versions of the weapons used on the fireteam, though not always the case. Some examples would be the 5.56mm SPR Mk 12, the M110 SASS or other semi-automatic rifles. Now that we have those two definitions out of the way, its up to you to decide if you have a need for either of those two skill sets. I have found that the sniper concept has been romanticized to the point that folks want the skill more than need it. Just be honest with yourself and say you are enamored by the concept and just want to shoot at those ranges for fun. That's perfectly acceptable. Now for the real meat and potatoes, what it takes to lay down precision fire at long distances. I don't care if you have more money than sense and spent all your preparedness money on an $8000 suppressed Surgeon rifle chambered in .338 Lapua, topped with a Knightforce scope, if you don't have the knowledge and skill to employ it, you have a heavy telescope at best. Don't get me wrong, equipment choice and quality are VERY important but skills are equally important. You have to be able to shoot tight groups consistently. There are a lot of factors involved it hitting a 10” target at 1000 meters, which seems to be everyone's dream. Let me explain:
  • A Minute of Angle is a measurement of about 1/60th of a degree. At 100m it is 1 inch, at 200 it's 2 inches, 1000m it's 10 inches and so on. That means if you remove all human factors and environmental factors from shooting a gun that can shoot all it's shots within an inch (a 1 MOA gun), the best it could do at 1000m is a 10 inch group. If you don't do your part, the most accurate gun in the world cannot compensate for you. If the target is a 10 inch vital area and you are shooting at 1000 meters with a 1 MOA capable gun, you have no room for shooter error. A gun capable of 1/4 MOA will cost you SUBSTANTIALLY more than 1 MOA gun.
  • Environmental factors play a HUGE role in what the bullet does once it leaves the barrel. Winds blow lightweight bullets around like feathers. Temperature affects the trajectory of the bullet, the temperature of the barrel, the ammo and, your performance. Some argue that high humidity effects how “thick” the air is and changes the trajectory. Elevation and barometric pressure also play a significant role in external ballistics.
  • Shooter skill is just as important. If you can't shoot a 1 inch group at 100 yards with the most accurate rifle in the world, how do you expect it to hit a 10 inch vital area at 1000 meters? Shoot 10K rounds of 22LR if you must to perfect your fundamentals.
  • Optics matter. If your scope has poor quality glass you won't be able to see your target clearly at distance. The scope must have high quality mechanisms that move the reticle around within the scope. They must be reliable and repeatable. If you add 25 clicks of elevation and then return to zero, it should return to zero every time and should not track diagonally. Ideally, your scope should have a modern reticle that allows for range estimation with markings to “hold” for different distances or wind. This negates the need to turn knobs and wear out the innards of the scope, and makes adjusting for targets at varying distances and winds extremely fast. Additionally, the scope should have a parallax adjustment if it has adjustable magnification. I could write an entire article just on scopes, first focal plane, fixed power, second focal plane, variable power, lighted and unlighted reticles, mildot and tactical milling reticles.....it can get overwhelming. [gallery ids="1991,1990,1988"]
  • Range estimation is paramount to shooting at virtually any distance. Contrary to what a lot of people think, bullets don't exit the barrel and go like a laser beam straight to the target. Gravity immediately affects them as soon as they exit. As a matter of fact, if two projectiles, one fired from a gun, the other dropped at the exact same time, both will hit the ground the exact same time if the run is fired dead level. To compensate for gravity, we aim higher, that means the bullet goes up to it's “max ordinance” then comes back down to meet the point of aim. The scope is zeroed for a specific distance. This actually corresponds with another point along the flight path. For example, the Army zeros the M4 at 25 meters which results in a 300m zero. This allows you to use ranges with much shorter distances to zero for longer distance. Range estimation becomes very important because, if you don't know the range to the target, you can't compensate for the bullet's trajectory. For example, if you have a 600m zero on a 308 rifle, depending on bullet type and environmental factors, it could drop 250 inches at 1000m. Imagine the drop with a 100m zero! Again, regardless of how expensive and tacticool your rifle is, if you do not understand this you will miss a 10” steel plate at 1000 yards, not to mention a 19.5” x 39” torso taget. You MUST know the distance to compensate for gravity...unless you are shooting a laser beam.
Now that we have discussed some of the factors that affect where your bullets impact, lets talk gear selection. Semi-automatic or bolt action? Bolt guns are simple, reliable and inherently more accurate than gas operated rifles. The major disadvantage is that for the average person, they are slower. Most beginners also tend to remove their face (break the cheekweld) from the stock each time the cycle the bolt. One can overcome this with practice and training.

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The semi-automatic rifle has more moving parts, thus is more susceptible to malfunctions and people have a tendency to just keep pulling the trigger because, well, they can. This also heats up the barrel. They also tend to cost a little more (for a good one). On the up side, you can have a larger capacity magazine, because it self loads you don't tend to remove your face from the stock (so you are still looking through the scope for a follow up shot), and you can shoot faster. In my opinion, I bipod is almost a necessity for a long range precision rifle, as well as a good sling and a shooting sock. Always cheat when you can. All 3 of these can take a lot of human error out of the equation and that's a good thing. A bipod can be extended and put against a wall to provide a good supported position for shooting from the standing position (just be cognizant of your muzzle). A sling can be wrapped around your wrist to provide stability. A shooting sock can be placed under the buttstock to provide a nice, squeeze adjustable rest which acts similarly to the bipod. There are many uses and variations but I won't go into them all. [gallery columns="2" size="medium" ids="1987,1989"] I have omitted scope selection here because I think it was covered enough for this article above. However, this is a good segue into range finders. If your scope doesn't have a reticle that allows you to accurately calculate range (or you don't know how to use it) you need a rangefinder. They aren't exactly cheap either if you get one that can accurately read out to 1000m. One does not simply buy a Mosin-Nagant at the surplus store and go to the nearest 1000 meter soybean field and slay targets. While that gun could, with the right modifications and shooter, do that, why not get something from the modern era? There are people that shoot 1000 yard (learn to use the metric system if you want to shoot long range) matches with old 45-70 Sharps rifles from the 1870s with iron sights but does that pass the smell test for the prepper? If it was so awesome, why aren't we (Special Forces) using it? I can tell you it isn't because of budget cuts. To put this into perspective, I'll give you the setup of one of my frugal long range precision systems (pictured above), and it works. Remington 700 PSS in 300 Winchester Magnum-$700 (I recommend a 308 due to short barrel life of the 300WM), Larue 20 MOA base-$75, Les Baer 30mm scope rings-$100, 20 year old Leupold M1 Ultra fixed 20x scope-$1000, Harris adjustable short bipod with swivel lock-$90, adjustable cheekpiece on a modified factory HS Precision stock-$120, tactical bolt knob, trigger job and threaded barrel with a muzzle brake-3 organic chickens and a bunch of free range eggs or about $200, a Leupold rangefinder-$500 and Ballistic AE ballistic app for Iphone-$20. That's a grand total of about $2800 but keep in mind, this is a system, not just a rifle. I have a bunch of other accessories like a drag bag and other things that I did not count. Most of the accessories on this gun were much cheaper and I got them in trades but those are realistic numbers if you are paying cash. You can do it cheaper by getting different brand names of items but do not skimp on the scope. The barrel and the scope are the two most important items of the rifle in terms of accuracy and long range shooting.log book One scope I recommend is the Bushnell HDMR with a Tremor 2 or Horus 59 reticle. Those reticles seem complicated but once you know how to use them they are deadly and worth their weight in gold. The Bushnell offers all the same features of the infinitely more expensive tactical scopes with near the same quality for 1/3rd the price. If you look you can find someone trying to sell a used one cheaper than the average $1500 price tag. I know that sounds like a lot but you can't put a cheap Chinese scope on a gun and expect to consistently do what the big boys do. What does this all mean? Shooting precisely out to 1000m (which appears to be most peoples goal) is not really that easy, it requires a lot of training and cannot be consistently achieved with crappy gear. Is it worth your money to have this capability? Is the capability even a realistic goal in your preparedness scenario? If this is still something you would like to pursue, let us know. We have Special Forces Sniper qualified instructors to teach you. You don't need an $8000 setup, we can teach you within the limitations of your current equipment and you can grow from there. However you must know those limitations and have realistic goals. There is a tremendous amount of information to be covered on long range precision shooting and this article barely scratches the surface. De Oppresso Liber. [caption id="attachment_981" align="aligncenter" width="640"]Firearms, Tactical & Defense Training Firearms, Tactical & Defense Training[/caption]
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To see or not to see?

You've seen them around. You've seen the infamous "green-eyed" image. The you ask yourself: Is night vision for my weapon (or any other related task) a realistic expense for me? Honest answer, only you know.NVGs: Can you justify it? You've seen them around. You've seen the infamous "green-eyed" image. Then you ask yourself: Is night vision for my weapon (or any other related task) a realistic expense for me? Honest answer, only you know. Night vision on a defensive weapon system is completely subjective. For the average prepper this might even be a distant dream. Cost always being the number one issue to overcome. Which one to buy? Which "Generation"? Head mount or mounted to the gun? Well, let's examine where you are in your preps and where you see yourself in the grand scheme of things.

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Quality night visions can be had relatively inexpensively. From any one of various online suppliers to gun shows to even eBay and amazon. Typically for a weapon mounted system, I'd say the tried and true PVS-14 like the one shown here, Gen 3 or better. Solid balance of features vs cost. Head mount, weapon mount or standalone...the PVS-14 is going to meet your needs. Is that the only choice? NO. But it's one of the best. What are your needs? Why would you mount night vision to a weapon system? There are indeed several angles to see this from. The actuation of a weapon light may not always be the best option when low/no light scenarios play out. The ability to see when others cannot need not be explained in detail. Hunting in a grid-down situation could make vastly easier using infrared. Threat identification and maintaining stealth also cannot be overstated. The ability to dismount the sight and use it in "standalone" mode is also, in my honest opinion, critical. In complete, 100% darkness, modern night vision are equipped with a device called an "IR illuminators". Essentially a built-in infrared flashlight. No light? No problem. IR2 Can less expensive NVG's handle the shock of a modern firearm? I can't speak for the under $1000 versions. I'm sure they have their strengths. One of the most imperative features is the "image intensifier tube". The part of the NVG that actually interprets and projects the image you see. Older tubes were made of glass which were notorious for breakage. Modern, more advanced NVG's tubes are made of a composite material which is much more robust and thus can take more punishment. Care and feeding of your NVG's is a topic that many people who have limited or no exposure will want to invest time in. IR3 Typical models employ one or two "AA" batteries, so locating power for your night vision shouldn't be a problem. Also to consider is your intended usage overall. Firearm mounted NV tends to be "monocular" or single tube units. There are several other types of night vision that would be equally effective in a head/helmet mounted setup. Just depends on your as the user.

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Bottom line you have to answer is: Do I NEED this or WANT it? To ME, that answer is subjective. I feel personally that due to its obvious strategic and tactical advantage...it's a NEED. But that's me. At Crisis Application Group, we are prepared to make sure your needs and wants balance out in your plans for prepping for any scenario. [caption id="attachment_981" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Firearms, Tactical & Defense Training Firearms, Tactical & Defense Training[/caption]
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An upcoming titan in the optics field! Part 1

Gather 'round, preppers. We need to talk. We are constantly on the hunt for new and innovative products that aren't going to kill your wallet but will still provide you reliable service. We feel pretty good about an upcoming company we've recently discovered.

atibalMCRD1

The guys over at Atibal Sights have got some wicked little toys that are delivering the bang for your buck. And they're getting it done pretty well so far from what we've seen. I first found them when their website popped up in my feed. I get a LOT of firearm related gear in my feed, but I started seeing these guys quite a bit. I figured, "Why not?" Called them direct and filled them in what it is we do professionally and we got sent a sample model of their MCRD, or Micro Red Dot sight.

atibal

The box shows up. Attractive packaging which is a plus, pride in product. Bonus one of many. Upon opening I notice that the unit runs on an included AAA battery. Another plus as preppers tend to be rather...cough...frugal...in nature. No super expensive camera batteries to hunt for should that "grid down" scenario come to pass. The unit comes with the installation wrench, a lens cloth, wrapped carefully in protective foam and includes comprehensive instructions. The unit feature side mounted controls, which for me is a huge bonus so I don't have to jack around with ill conceived buttons and gloves in bad timed evolutions. Then came the little thing on top which peaked my interest. Back to the instructions, which had I read fully in the first place... [gallery ids="1365,1366,1367"] The object is an active sensor that allows the unit to detect changing light conditions and adjust accordingly to guard your hash when you go from bright outside to a dark interior. Pretty cool if you ask me. This feature is actuated with a single press of the conveniently located power switch on the left side of the body. Aesthetically, the unit is overall fairly attractive which to me is not necessarily a show stopper but it certainly doesn't hurt, either. Pound for pound, you wouldn't know that you hadn't spent quite a bit more than you had. We all know that money these days doesn't go near as far as it used to. That is what initially drew my attention to Atibal. What was this? Airsoft copies? Nope. Turns out they are a great group of guys trying to bang out a living the American way just like the rest of us.

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They are providing a quality product at a great price and doing so in a time when that's not so easy. You are going to very soon be seeing their entire product line available in our CAG online store. This will also be an ongoing review process as we are looking very much forward to seeing more of their products up close. Part 2 of this review will be range review where we put this model through it's paces... #newprepperfirearmhotness #awinningteam #atibalisdoinwork #preppersaintcheap [caption id="attachment_981" align="aligncenter" width="300"]unnamed Firearms, Tactical & Defense Training[/caption]
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Glock 19, The best pistol for preppers.

The argument has been had over and over, time and again. Now its time to settle the debate, the jury has come back in. The (un)official best "Prepper Handgun" you can buy is the Glock 19. The Glock 19 has been selected as the critic's choice as the Chosen One. Why you may ask? We're glad you asked!The argument has been had over and over, time and again. Now its time to settle the debate, the jury has come back in. The (un)official best "Prepper Handgun" you can buy is the Glock 19. The Glock 19 has been selected as the critic's choice as the Chosen One. Why you may ask? We're glad you asked! Over the course of many years, countless debates and ballistics tests, the 9mm has been selected as the superior defensive round by a scientific, comprehensive review of it's velocity, penetration and capacity. Manageable recoil, wide availability, international usage and low price point are but a few other major considerations.

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Never to be at a lack of upgrades, modifications, or performance enhancements - the Glock 19 is a solid fit in the hands of the most battle hardened operator or the newest lady shooter, having never touched a firearm previously. User friendly fire control, no clumsy exterior controls or levers to get hung up on, the G19's sleek lines won't bind up in a holster or get hung in a cover garment when making a draw in a defensive scenario. No special tools or complicated breakdown procedures, the G19 breaks down in three easy steps. Presto, you're done. Lubricant/CLP of your choice and she's battle ready. Using it's own magazines or it's bigger brother's, it's combat adaptable to almost any scenario. Robust in it's construction, the finish is highly corrosion and scratch resistant. You won't have to worry about it being to susceptible to too much as far as wear and tear is concerned.

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Many makers out there have found that they can make near perfect better. There are barrels, pin kits, triggers, frame enhancements, lights and sights...well...you get the point. And if you think by now that we dig Glocks, you'd be spot on! We do. And with good reason. No, we are not sponsored by them. We receive no kickback from them. We simply go with what works and what we've come to trust and feel comfortable recommending you trust as well. While we agree there is NO such thing as a "one stop solution", the G19 is pretty darned close. It performs very well under combat stresses as we effectively demonstrated to our recent pistol clinic class held in Ohio. [caption id="attachment_911" align="aligncenter" width="300"]G19 in action during the Ohio tactical clinic G19 in action during the Ohio tactical clinic[/caption] We are interested in your feedback whether you agree or not. Your opinions are equally valid, just make sure you use fact and reason as your tools!

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Sources and citations:
article: FBI report on 9mm lethality
article: 9mm Justification for FBI
article: SOF and 9mm Glock
article: SOF converting to the 9mm Glock
article: SMU and the 9mm Glock
article: Glock popularity and availability
article: Glock is easy to learn
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Barrel Cleaning Part 1

I don't often make absolute statements, especially about firearms. There's always somebody out there who did it different and has good results, so even if you know why, it's best to just nod your head and "go along to get along".I don't often make absolute statements, especially about firearms. There's always somebody out there who did it different and has good results, so even if you know why, it's best to just nod your head and "go along to get along". On the other hand, there are some things that just have to be said, and you aren't going to hear them from the normal shooting press, whom I perceive to be generally scared to death of offending anyone who is an advertiser, or might someday be an advertiser. I have quite a bit more freedom than that.

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Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead: If you don't know what you are doing, the worst thing you can do to a rifle is shove a cleaning rod down the barrel. That's right. I'm going to fill you in on something that competitive shooters have known for 20 or more years, but hasn't really seemed to percolate out to the general shooting public. You've probably heard that competitive shooters are fanatics about keeping their rifles, and especially the bores, shiny clean. You may have even heard some apocryphal stories about gunsmiths who received rifles that "just wouldn't shoot good anymore" and all they needed was a good cleaning. All of this is at least partially true. But without the right equipment, pushing a discount store cleaning rod down the barrel of your rifle can permanently damage the rifling, especially in the critical throat area where the rifling begins ahead of the chamber and at the muzzle. You can also end up with cleaning solvents leaking out of and under the action, softening the critical bedding areas. All of these things, and more, can ruin the fine accuracy of a perfectly good rifle, just from doing something that you THINK is helpful.

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Damage to the bore is generally caused by the cleaning rod contacting the barrel steel, and the use of some types of bore cleaners can make the damage occur faster. Sectioned rods are out. They just have too much flex in them. Pushing them down the bore with a jag and patch that actually fit will result in the rod contacting the bore. In addition, the sections never fit together absolutely perfectly, resulting in ridges that can pick up carbon grit and/or physically damage the barrel itself. Never ever use a stainless steel cleaning rod.... for that matter, never put anything that's stainless steel in the bore of your rifle. You don't need anything that's anywhere close to the hardness of the barrel steel itself in there. Likewise, don't use uncoated brass or aluminum rods. They can pick up carbon grit or abrasive bore cleaners that can do a very fine job of unintentional lapping. Just ask a machinist what you can do with an aluminum rod charged with grit. [caption id="attachment_664" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Pic from Gunn Innovations www.spinjag.com Pic from Gunn Innovations www.spinjag.com[/caption] This is an extreme example, but that's often the best way to illustrate a point. The point is: either do it the simple way, or go whole hog, but don't inbetween it. (I'm not one of those people who advocate never cleaning a rifle. Torture tests are interesting but I was taught to acquire fine tools and then take care of them.) [caption id="attachment_665" align="aligncenter" width="660"]CLP and a bore snake is the fast and easy way to bore clean without damage. CLP and a bore snake is the fast and easy way to bore clean without damage.[/caption] The simple way is with a basic bore solvent and a bore snake. Squirt a little solvent down the bore, being careful to get it into the chamber and not into the action, and then drop the bore snake weight down the barrel while keeping the bore pointed down. Step on the string end of the bore snake with your foot and pull on the rifle to get the bore snake started in the bore. This procedure keeps the solvent from running back into the action. Once you have the bore sealed, you can invert the rifle and pull the bore snake all of the way out. If you suspect the bore is especially dirty, you can repeat this procedure several times. Before you finish, pull the bore snake through the bore several times without adding solvent, and you are done with bore cleaning. [caption id="attachment_666" align="alignleft" width="300"]A correct cleaning rod is one piece, coated, has a ball bearing spin handle, and is specific to the caliber of the bore you are cleaning A correct cleaning rod is one piece, coated, has a ball bearing spin handle, and is specific to the caliber of the bore you are cleaning[/caption] This is the correct kind of cleaning rod. It's one piece brass covered in a protective nylon coating, it's caliber specific to prevent flexing, and it has a ball bearing on the handle so brushing and patching tools rotate with the rifling. The one pictured is a Dewey. Boretech also makes some fine cleaning rods. There are probably others but these are the two that I have used, and the ones I see other competitive shooters using. Even with the proper coated cleaning rod, you don't just shove it down the bore. You need what's called a rod guide to hold the rod centered in the bore. For any rifle that can be cleaned from the chamber end (bolt guns and ARs) they can also seal the chamber so solvent doesn't leak back into the receiver. Rod guides are available from a few places but I highly recommend the ones from Sinclair International, purveyors of many fine tools and supplies for cleaning and reloading. [caption id="attachment_667" align="aligncenter" width="400"]Sinclair bore guides are made of machined delrin plastic with an O-ring seal. Sinclair bore guides are made of machined delrin plastic with an O-ring seal.[/caption] The bore guide is inserted into the receiver where it guides the rod, seals the chamber, and provides a port to apply solvents, so you can keep cleaners in the barrel and not on your rifle. For an AR platform they also sell some handy little links that hold the receivers apart just right for cleaning. This is how it looks on an AR: [caption id="attachment_668" align="aligncenter" width="225"]Sinclair makes the bore guide and the link used to hold the receivers apart. Sinclair makes the bore guide and the link used to hold the receivers apart.[/caption] This is doing it right. The rifle is held so it's slightly muzzle down, allowing excess cleaner to run out the end of the barrel instead of into the action. A bore guide is in the receiver to seal the chamber and guide the cleaning rod. [caption id="attachment_669" align="aligncenter" width="660"]Doing it right. Doing it right.[/caption] In part two, I'll cover the proper process for using a cleaning rod in more detail, including more specifics about brushes, jags, patches, and cleaning compounds.
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MY AR10 SDM Build

A couple of months ago I mentioned on Special Forces Preppers that I was building an AR10 platform rifle to upgrade to the .308 cartridge. That project is now finished, although I am still working up loads for it. A couple of months ago I mentioned on Special Forces Preppers that I was building an AR10 platform rifle to upgrade to the .308 cartridge.  That project is now finished, although I am still working up loads for it. I feel it may be helpful to head off the "....but what about....?" replies by running through a short discussion of my criteria for building this particular rifle.  The most important criterion was for a rifle that could function as the primary armament for a squad designated marksman, while retaining some tactical utility.  As such, it needed to stay short and light enough to at least be usable in tactical situations, while still having sufficient power at extended range to be effective at +500 yards versus the standard carbine armament, or around 800 yards overall.  I felt that a mid-length AR10 in .308 Win was the best platform to build such a "compromise" on. And.... the finished product. 2315837

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So let's get right to it, from back to front: Stock:  Magpul PRS.  Stock options on the .308 platform are not wide, and although it's a little heavy, it's not heavy enough to unbalance the rifle.  The ability to maintain a solid, consistent cheek weld with optics that are fairly high above the bore (compared to bolt guns) put this stock over the top for me. Buffer Spring:  I have to mention this separately because no, I don't just use a stock spring, and yes, there is a very good reason why.  David Tubb's CS springs are awesome for many applications but possibly nowhere are they more useful than on an AR platform.  For every reason you would use one on an AR15, it's doubly important on an AR10 just because the volume of gas is so much greater.  If you didn't know:  yes, the buffer spring is an important part of your semiauto gas system. Lower:  DPMS Gen1.  Because it's what I had.  Got a really good deal on a complete rifle, and parted out the upper and other parts I didn't need for basically what I paid for the whole thing.  There are slightly nicer lowers available with larger trigger guards for gloves, but I didn't think it was worth the trouble. Grip:  Ergo Grip.  This is probably a matter of taste, and this is what my taste is. Trigger:  Geissele B-G2 S-E.  I prefer a two-stage trigger for precision shooting. This is Geissele's Enhanced two-stage trigger, which means it has a first stage of 2.3 lbs and a second stage of 1.2 lbs, instead of a total weight of 4.5 lbs like you will find on a LOT of AR platform triggers.  It was expensive, and worth every penny IMO. Upper:  Aero Precision M4.  Yes it's an M4 style upper not an A3, meaning it has the M4 feedramp cuts.  You can't get this in a Gen1 DPMS brand upper. Charging Handle:  An AR platform with a scope on it needs a good charging handle, and the standard ones have problems with the latch that just begs for an upgrade.  I chose the Bravo Company BCM Gunfighter Medium handle.  You can spend a bunch of money on a charging handle.  I compromised in a lot of ways here, this one has an improved, extended latch and was reasonably priced. Bolt Carrier Group:  Alex Pro Armory.  One of the few sources for nickel boron coated bolt carrier parts for AR10 that I could find, and they also use 9310 steel for the bolt (win!).  It's cheaper to order directly from them than it is to buy from Brownell's or Midway. Barrel extension:  I don't know what brand it is, as it was provided by the gunsmith that did the barrel.  All I know is it has M4 feedramp cuts, which is important if you are using an M4 upper. Barrel:  Shilen stainless 18", custom configured by Craddock Precision.  The barrel is ported for a mid length gas system, tapered to .835" from chamber to gas block, then stepped down to .750" at the gas block and same diameter to the muzzle threads, fully fluted fore and aft of the gas block.  I wanted the stiffest, lightest barrel I could get away with without fouling up the balance of the rifle.  Paul Craddock suggested adding the extra meat between the chamber and the gas block and I'm glad we did. Handguard:  Troy Alpha.  I can't say enough good things about this handguard.  It's super light, which lets me put more weight on the barrel where it actually does something.  The accessory rails are easy to install and configure, and I absolutely love the rubber insert "squid grips" that give a slightly larger, slightly tacky surface to index your support hand on for normal positions.  The downside is that you are going to have to pick your gas block very, very carefully to make sure it fits under the darn thing. Gas Block:  JP Enterprises JPGS-5G.  It's low profile, blackened stainless, and adjustable.  That last part is important because I expect this rifle to function flawlessly with both 175gr and 150gr loads, out of an 18" barrel with mid length gas system.  Some ability for adjustment is very handy.  There really wasn't a second choice here. Compensator:  BattleComp BABC.  Not only a compensator with value for reducing muzzle climb, but also a flash hider that doesn't direct any gas downwards, reducing dust signature when firing prone. Cerakote:  Brothers in Arms, Tulsa OK.  A veteran owned business.  Highly recommended. Sights: Flip up iron sights:  MagPul MBUS Scope:  Vortex Viper PST 6.5-24x50 in LaRue SPR1.5 mount.  This optic is being used for load development.  It will actually wear a Burris XTR II 3-15x50 34mm tube optic when they can be bothered to start shipping them. Tactical Sight:  Aimpoint PRO in LaRue quick detach mount. I must mention I went with a swappable optic setup instead of a microsight on a 45 degree canted mount because I want to be able to integrate an NVG monocle with the red dot at a later date. I hope this was informative.

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Assaulter versus defender (videoclip)

The military has a lot of combat skills that could enhance the survivability and lethality of a marksman. But have you considered why they learn the techniques they do? The military specializes in offensive operations and by default trains mostly on how to assault. When you look around do you see the need to take ground? Or to defend what you have? There is a lot of overlap when it comes to offensive and defensive skills, as they say " the best defense is a good offense" and we definitely agree. But on your limited budget if you are focusing on skills that are intended to support room clearing or raids you may be better served reconsidering your approach. Learning how to shoot FROM the concealed carry is an excellent place to start. This is sometimes called a retention shot, that is shooting from close ranges and using muscle memory to aim your shots. When you're searching for a Concealed Carry Weapons (CCW) class, make sure you are also learning how to shoot from a concealed holster, and most likely when your shirt is tucked in or wearing a jacket. Simulate as many day-to-day details as you can. This isn't about points on the bull's eye... It's certainly fun to plink steel targets on the range, but can you shoot with your heart rate up? While getting assaulted? In close quarters? Maybe there is a crowd? Are you practicing verbal commands? If you're not sure and still need to ask some questions hit us up on Facebook and start a dialogue. We can help get you pointed in the right direction. As always, thank you and follow us on Facebook @Crisis Application Group.

[embed]https://youtu.be/oEFPcljAXgs[/embed]

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