What is the first Antibiotic, or even Medication, that one should stockpile for Survival? 

Easy question to answer! Self sufficient personnel often ask Austere Medical Professionals which medications, especially antibiotics they should stockpile to treat themselves or others in preparation of a time where the medical system may have collapsed, from geographical instability such as a Katrina like event to an economic event mirroring or worse than what Greece is currently going through.antibiotics Easy question to answer! Self sufficient personnel often ask Austere Medical Professionals which medications, especially antibiotics they should stockpile to treat themselves or others in preparation of a time where the medical system may have collapsed, from geographical instability such as a Katrina like event to an economic event mirroring or worse than what Greece is currently going through. My answer for which antibiotics/meds one should stockpile for that situation is none, maybe over-the-counter meds.  You're going to have to work hard to get from "None" to "Some."  Give me a second to explain myself.

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You can do a lot of harm by taking or giving medications, even the right ones. Best case scenario it didn't help at all, it could make it worse, and worst case be fatal. There is a reason why medical professionals are the only ones who can give certain medications. I'm not saying you need to rush out and go to Med School, but I am saying you're going to have to study and learn. While Medical Professionals have the foundation of schooling, that is not where knowledge is gained, it's where it just begins: What separates successful medical providers from the rest is studying and continuing to learn. So if a Doctor studies medications, why aren't you? Let's put it this way, You owe your patients, including yourself, the best possible treatment they could receive. Truly understanding why you're doing something is different from, "I'll buy Medication 'A' incase they have Sickness 'A'." Knowing which medication to give for which illness or injury is a knee-jerk reaction that does not account for obstacles and makes clinical judgment lazy. That's right, lazy. Medications are not just to be acquired and then left on a shelf. You don't treat by asking them to open their mouth, then throwing pills at them and whatever lands in there is good to go. You need to put some serious study hours in.

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It's the same concept as your Concealed Carry Weapon, you don't (or I hope you do not) buy it, slap a magazine in it and never touch it again; You do dry fire drills, go to the range, have spare parts, maintain and clean it. Weapons often get all the glamour, but the truth is you're far more likely to face a medical scenario, so why would you neglect the tools of the medical world? If you're going to use a medication you should know how it works, how much to give, side effects, alternate medications, and why you are giving it, etc. etc. Before that, you should know the patients history, especially medications, allergies. If they are allergic to cephalosporins, is Keflex good to give, or would you rather give Cefalexin? Is it used for gram positive or gram negative bacteria? Which antibiotics do you give for viruses? Will they survive without antibiotics? Why would you want to treat a teenager with strep throat? Now, The first antibiotic, the first medication someone should stockpile is a pharmacopeia as well as other references such as a Nursing Drug Handbook. [caption id="attachment_1968" align="aligncenter" width="600"]The good news is knowledge weighs nothing and you can take it with you everywhere! It's never hurts to have a few books on hand to double check, though. The good news is knowledge weighs nothing and you can take it with you everywhere! It's never hurts to have a few books on hand, though. There is a lot to remember and reference.[/caption]

"What if medicine is not my thing?"

If you're not that dedicated or medicine is not your forte, that is understandable. A minimum option that I wholeheartedly recommend for medical basics is the book, "When There Is No Doctor." It's used in countries as a medical reference for places that are much too far away to get help and casualty evacuation can be a voyage, much like what you and I prepare for. In addition, You can still benefit from keeping your stocks of medication, they are great to barter but may not be your level to administer care. Learning the chemistry and effects of medications takes YEARS of education and practice. Don't be in a hurry and don't settle for Google. Locate and learn how to use the references that the professionals use! CAG runs a forum called CAG NET, join and ask questions!

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Last modified onThursday, 20 April 2017 06:31

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